Great advice while working with teens

School librarian K.C. Boyd was featured in November’s School Library Journal article, “A Leader for Readers.” She ended her wonderful article with a list of advice from her father that has carried her through her career. Boyd has “experienced more failures than successes.” For this reason, I value her perspective of the job and the challenges and joys it has to offer.

Know your subject matter Do your research, read the books, and practice using the social media pages prior to introducing them to students.

Have respect It’s a two-way street with today’s kids. When they observe that you are making an effort to respect them, they will be more cooperative.

Listen Students will provide you with the blueprint for any program you are trying to implement.

Have patience If it doesn’t work, try, try again.

Keep a sense of humor Laugh at yourself, make those mistakes with the students, and just keep laughing.

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Dream Projects

I wish I could be involved in these library projects or get something like this for my library one day!

The Great Reading Adventure is an online summer reading program that trumps our current online software (Evanced’s Summer Reader) in almost every way. The design is cool, the features are awesome, and it’s much more interactive. I hope to use this in the future at my library!

Chicago City of Learning is another amazing project that I’m super jealous of. I started to look into badges for my summer reading program but couldn’t conceptualize how it would all work. CCOL has done a fantastic job of promoting connected learning and awarding badges.

From their website:

“CCOL is a groundbreaking initiative that joins together learning opportunities for young people in a way that allows them to think about, pursue, and develop their interests. CCOL breaks down the false barriers between learning that happens in school and learning that happens outside of school. Through CCOL young people can take new paths of discovery, explore the city’s rich resources and find out what they can learn, make, do, and ultimately become.”

I wish I worked in Chicago right now…


Teen Book Club – The Fault in Our Stars

May’s Teen Book Club was really popular because I picked probably the most popular YA book in the universe right now, The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. We had an awesome discussion about the book (“What does the title even mean?” “Are they gonna make the trophy kicking scene as great in the movie as it is in the book?” “I hate Monica.” “I love books just like Hazel does.”)

I showed the trailer for the new movie coming out June 6, plus a behind the scenes video from John Green. Most importantly, though, I talked about Esther Earl, whom the book is dedicated to. She made a huge impact on John Green’s and many others’ lives. Living with thyroid cancer and being attached to an oxygen tank in her teen years did not crush Esther’s spirit. Read more about her in her own words; her family published a memoir of her diary entries in “This Star Won’t Go Out.” At the end we made constellation jars.

 

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Candy Sushi Teen Program

All the colors of the rainbow

All the colors of the rainbow

We had a great program the other night for teens and tweens at my library: CANDY SUSHI! It was so cool to watch everyone come up with different designs for their sushi. We put out lots of candy, I mean LOTS. The ingredients were:

  • Fruit roll ups (to be the nori)
  • Rice Krispy treats (to be the rice)
  • Swedish Fish
  • Gummy sharks
  • Gummy worms
  • Skittles
  • Sunkist gummy fruit
  • Airheads Xtremes (a flexible length of rainbow sour/sweet candy)
  • Twizzlers
  • Nerds

Just like the show “Iron Chef,” we also had a secret ingredient which was candied melon strips. Everyone constructed their sushi for about 40 minutes. Then they all put their plates up at the main table and voted on Most Colorful, Most Authentic, and Best in Show. The plates were numbered to keep things simple and anonymous. The winner received chopsticks, origami paper, and a Japanese snack. Best in Show got some dried fish snack too! (A gag gift but still fun!)

All the pictures from the program are up on Abington Free Library’s Picasa site here. I would definitely do this program again. It would be great for all ages, not just tweens and teens, but also families with younger children as well.


Total YA books I’ve looked at this year

Total books = 1018

Total books = 1018

To go along with my previous post about book budgets, I decided to count up all the books I considered buying for the YA collection this year. I usually read the following book review magazines for YA reviews: School Library Journal, VOYA, Booklist, Publisher’s Weekly, and New York Times Book Review. But I also depend on the reviews that appear on my book vendor’s website which includes Kirkus Reviews (I use Ingram’s iPage). I find myself usually siding with what Kirkus and VOYA have to say.

This list gives you an idea of how many books I’ve considered this year for YA. And most of these books have multiple reviews that I have to read and evaluate, including lots of books that have both rave reviews and horrible reviews.

Total YA books considered in 2013: 1018

Total YA books ordered: 336 or 33% of the books considered

Number of YA books still on my A-list that I haven’t ordered: 271 or 26% of books considered (a small percentage of these books have a 2014 release date)

Number of books on my B-list (mixed reviews): 259 or 25% of book considered

Number of books on my C-list (bad reviews): 93 or 9% of books considered

Number of Manga still on my A-list that I haven’t ordered: 45

Number of book on my MUST-ORDER list: 14 (these are still to-be-published but they are on my radar)

Wow, this puts into perspective how much work I did this year for collection development in YA. I read reviews for over 1,000 books, and with each books getting 2 or more reviews, that’s over 2,000 reviews that I’ve read this year. I’m exhausted looking at this number. It would be interesting to do this again for 2014 and compare.

For those of you wondering how I get my numbers: for every book I consider, I add it to some kind of list, either MUST ORDER, A, B, or C-list. This helps me keep track of what I’ve already looked at so I’m not duplicating my work and looking at books several times. If I see it’s already on a list, I move on to the next book review.


End of Year Review

CC license

2013 is almost over. It’s been a great year at Abington Free Library. Here’s what I’m most proud of this year.

Teen Book Club

The Teen Advisory Board at the library suggested that we start a book club this year. It’s been pretty popular so far. Every time we host a book club, the first 10 teens to sign up get a free copy of the book. These free copies were purchased with money donated by the Friends of Abington Libraries and I’m so grateful!

February – Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

April – Divergent by Veronica Roth – Most popular with 22 teens attending!

June – The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson

August – Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King – The author graced us with a visit, answered questions, and signed books. She is a rad lady. You should follow her on twitter: @ AS_King

October – Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

We will continue the Teen Book Club in 2014. The first book of the year will be Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare.


Japanese Mascots Program

Japanese Mascots Program

From the Japanese mascot program on November 4 , 2013 at Abington Free Library

Click on the photo for more!